Skip to content

Department of Education

Viewing archives for Researcher

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2), e12552.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12552

 

Ferrero, M, West, G, Vadillo, MA (2017) “Is crossed laterality associated with academic achievement and intelligence? A systematic review and meta-analysis”, PLOS ONE. 12(8) e0183618-e0183618.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183618

 

WEST, G, HULME, C “The procedural deficit hypothesis of language learning disorders: We still see some serious problems”, Developmental Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12813

 

Clayton, FJ, West, G, Sears, C, Hulme, C, Lervåg, A “A longitudinal study of early reading development: Letter-sound knowledge, phoneme awareness and RAN, but not letter-sound integration, predict variations in reading development”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2019.1622546

 

SNOWLING, M, HULME, C, WEST, G “Children’s language skills can be improved: lessons from psychological science for educational policy”, Current Directions in Psychological Science.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0963721420923684

 

West, G., Snowling, M. J., Lervåg, A., Buchanan‐Worster, E., Duta, M., Hall, A., McLachlan, H., & Hulme, C. (2021). “Early language screening and intervention can be delivered successfully at scale: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial.” Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13415

 

West, G., Lervåg, A., Snowling, M. J., Buchanan-Worster, E., Duta, M., & Hulme, C. (2022). Early language intervention improves behavioral adjustment in school: Evidence from a cluster randomized trial. Journal of School Psychology, 92, 334-345.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2022.04.006

Snowling, M. J., West, G., Fricke, S., Bowyer‐Crane, C., Dilnot, J., Cripps, D., … & Hulme, C. (2022). Delivering language intervention at scale: promises and pitfalls. Journal of Research in Reading.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12391

West, G., Melby-Lervåg, M., & Hulme, C. (2021). Is a procedural learning deficit a causal risk factor for developmental language disorder or dyslexia? A meta-analytic review. Developmental Psychology, 57(5), 749.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0001172

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Zhe works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development. She holds a PhD from the School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford.

She has an interdisciplinary research background, and conducts both qualitative and quantitative research and ethnographic fieldwork. Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • International higher education and student (im)mobilities
  • International higher education and world development
  • Transnational education space
  • International Chinese students
  • Citizenship, urban inclusiveness and social reproduction in China
Publications

Ilka Vari-Lavoisier is a Research Fellow on the project ‘International Student Mobility and World Development’  and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group’ led by Maia Chankseliani.

She brings to the Department a decade of experience researching international migration, as well as her expertise in transnational mixed-methods research design.
Ilka holds a BA in Political Science (Science Po, Aix-en-Provence), a joint master’s degree in Social Sciences (ENS/EHESS, Paris), and a PhD in Sociology from the École Normale Supérieure, Paris (France). Ilka held Fellowships at Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Trento before joining the University of Oxford. Since 2018, Ilka has been collaborating with various constituencies of the University, including the Migration and Mobility Network, the Department of Sociology, and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography.

Ilka’s research focuses on the migration and development nexus (visit her website for more information). Over the years, she developed an interdisciplinary approach to international migration in collaboration with economists, anthropologists, geographers, sociologists, social psychologists, and cognitive scientists (see her publications).

Her research at the crossroads of the cognitive sciences and social sciences played an active role in the launch of the Cognition & Migration project. This initiative, supported by the Fiske Lab at Princeton University and COMPAS, at the University of Oxford, received funding from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, the IC Migrations, and the FMSH in France, as well as the Refugee Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall and Nuffield College, in the UK. This project developed into a transnational empirical research endeavour involving over thirty scholars from different fields (see PLAN project for more information). As the principal researcher, Ilka supervised the design and implementation of this project led by the CEE at Sciences Po and COMPAS at Oxford (see last publication here).

Based on experience supervising multi-method and multi-sited data collections over four continents, Ilka taught research methods at UPenn, the Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, the University of Luxembourg, and the University of Oxford, with a focus on web-based surveys and mixed methods research. She has a keen interest in hybrid pedagogy and has been developing a range of hybrid teaching material over the last few years.

At Oxford, Ilka further developed her expertise in digital media methods. In collaboration with academic colleagues, videographers, and media specialists, she runs video training programmes for several departments. More broadly, she supports colleagues interested in leveraging video tools for their research, teaching, and impact activities.

Publications
  • 2022 “Travelling models: social engineering for development,” special issue, co-edited with Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan, Revue internationale des études du développement, 248 (1), https://doi.org/10.4000/ried.280
  • 2021 “Making Sense of One Another in Crossing Borders: Social Cognition and Migration Politics,“ special issue, co-edited with Susan T. Fiske, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061265
  • 2021 “Forecasting under uncertainty: How networks composition shape future-oriented cognition”, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 697(1), 99-119. https://doi.org/10.1177/00027162211061259
  • 2020 “Minds on the move: Crossing disciplines to shed new light on human cognition”, WIREs Cognitive Science, Volume 12, Issue (1) 1-11. http://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1548
  • 2019 “Collective Thinking in the Field: Distributed Cognition in Large-Scale Qualitative Research”, with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, Space and Society, 2019/4.
  • 2019 “On the complexities of collaborative ethnography: Ethical and methodological insights from the HOMInG project” with Paolo Boccagni, Milena Belloni, Sara Bonfanti, Aurora Massa, Luis-Eduardo Perez Murcia, Alejandro Miranda Nieto, IMISCOE Briefs on Methodological, Ethical and Epistemological Issues, 2019/12.
  • 2019 “Beyond Social Remittances: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Immaterial Circulations”, in The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Development, dir.: Ronald Skeldon and Tanja Bastia, Routledge Editions.
  • 2018 “Corruption et mobilités transnationales. Les migrants, acteurs de changement ?”, in Transnationalisme économique, social et politique, dir.: Lisa Chauvet, Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Thibault Jaulin, DeBoeck editions.
  • 2016 “Social Remittances and the Changing Transnational Political Landscape” with Thomas Lacroix and Peggy Levitt, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “The Economic Side of Social Remittances: How Money and Ideas circulate between Paris, Dakar, and New York”, Comparative Migration Studies, 4: 20.
  • 2016 “Paris – Dakar – Bokidiawé : Retour sur une aventure collective transnationale”, with Flore Gubert, Sandrine Mesplé-Somps and Inssa Sané, Ethnographiques.org, n° 32.
  • 2016 “Une invitation aux enquêtes transnationales. Retour sur le projet TIMME (Terrains Interdisciplinaires et Multi-sites : Migrations et Engagements)”, E- Migrinter, n° 14/2016
  • 2015 “Stepping Back From Your Figures to Figure Out More: From Linguistic to Cognitive limits of Transnational Surveys” in Observing Protest from a Place: The World Social Forum in Dakar, dir.: Johanna Siméant, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle & Isabelle Sommier, Amsterdam University Press.
  • 2011 “Heurs et malheurs des chômeurs créateurs d’entreprises. De la complémentarité entre ethnographie et économétrie”, Terrains et Travaux, vol. 2/2011.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Aliya teaches on the Comparative and International Education MSc programme at the Department of Education after having taught at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on how women in the South navigate their agency in highly constrained circumstances. Her specialised areas of interest are the capability approach, negative capability, epistemic paradoxicality and justice, and the promotion of knowledges (plural) and Southern epistemologies. Aliya actively engages in issues around the politics of representation and knowledge production in the academe. Aliya is currently accepting doctoral students with an interest in these areas.

 

Projects

‘Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on learning experiences of secondary school going age children among Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families’

Project summary:
COVID-19 related school disruption and closures have significantly impacted the lives of students. Notably, these disruptions have had a multi-fold impact on children living in ethnic minority families. Although ethnic and racial inequalities are persistent across contexts, this project particularly engages with young adults and other family members belonging to Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families living in England. Children in these families have been uniquely affected by the pandemic (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020), given the higher rates of prevalence of COVID among these communities and also greater and persistent structural inequalities.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic minority families have been identified as a focus of this research because firstly, these particular groups have been strongly impacted by COVID (Platt & Warwick, 2020; Trivedy et al., 2020) and secondly, their socio cultural specificities make them more susceptible to disadvantage during COVID related school closures (Bayrakdar & Guveli, 2020). Our particular focus is on secondary school children whose learning has been majorly disrupted due to national lockdowns and uncertainty regarding national assessments.

Therefore, this project aims to address the unique situation and experiences of these BAME families with secondary school age children to understand how COVID-related challenges are shaping their learning experiences, household dynamics and future aspirations.

This is an exploratory, project which fills an important gap in existing knowledge by taking a strong cultural lens to understanding how learning among Bangladeshi and Pakistani families could be supported, drawing on a deeper understanding of their lived realities and contextualised understanding of the challenges they face. The aim is not simply to reproduce a deficit discourse (which tends to be associated with families from these ethnic minority groups), but to understand family dynamics and the opportunities offered herein.

Funded by:

Cambridge Humanities Research Grants Scheme

Research team:

Professor Nidhi Singal and Dr Aliya Khalid

 

‘Bridging the Local and Global: Women’s Spaces and Collectives’

Project summary:
While globalisation aims to connect the world equitably, global perspectives are often privileged over the local. Often the voices of women from the South (metaphor for marginalised) are least heard. This project acknowledges that any ‘Global’ ideology of (Dis)order needs to include local women’s voices by studying how they have generated order/disorder to create ‘spaces of action’/reflection (defined as collectives). We propose a multi-phase, multi-method study of women’s ‘collective spaces’. We first explore how ‘collectives’ have been understood. We will learn from women themselves by conducting two interview based case studies on (i) access to reproductive healthcare (Northern Ireland/Ireland) and (ii) mothers’ collective experiences of educating their children during a pandemic (ethnic minority families in England). In bringing together law and education, archives and interviews, reproductive healthcare and education, this project offers a novel way of understanding – and recording – collective responses to local/global challenges.

Funded by:

Virtual Sandpits, The British Academy

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid, Dr Jane Rooney and Dr Ruth Houghton, Dr Kate spencer-Bennet, Alana Farrel Kate Spencer-Bennett

 

‘Gendered Inequalities in Education and Capability Spaces for Women/Girls (and others) in Pakistan During Covid’

Project summary: This project explores the cumulative intersectional experiences of women/girls (and others) that are shaped by multidimensional inequalities existing in their physical (urban/rural) and social (market, society, community and family) settings. In particular, how gender interacts with the different vectors of disadvantage (for example, economic, technological, social, cultural and political) within the perimeters of their location (urban/rural) and setting (labour market, society and family) is to be explored. We refer to what we call ‘spaces of action/reflection’ that provide unique gendered experiences of seeking education. This project will thus conceptualise ‘spaces’ as those gendered experiences marked by economic, technological, social, cultural and political disadvantages that girls (and others) face in their locations (physical and social) as they seek education in the times of the pandemic. Hence, ‘space’ not only refers to the physical (urban/rural), but also, the social (community, family), cultural (society) and personal (psychological) aspects within which girls/women (and others) live and seek education.

This research aims to identify how these ‘spaces’ generate opportunities and constraints for girls/women (and others) in Pakistan. This exploration is essential today when Covid-19 has created ruptures in the supportive structures of educational provision. In this regard, it is essential to understand the limits and opportunities for girls/women’s (and that of others) education in Pakistan within these ‘spaces’ that have come about as a result of Covid-19 related educational and social restructuring of opportunities. In sum, the aim of the project is to contribute to international education by creating a deeper understanding of the gendered vulnerabilities that intersect with disadvantages and placement (physical and social) vectors to produce gendered experiences for the most marginalised in the context of Pakistan.

Funded by:

British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) Seedcorn Fund

Research team:

Dr Aliya Khalid and Dr Soufia Siddiqui

 

Publications

Khalid, A. (forthcoming). ‘Hearing their silences: Mothers agency as they support their daughters’ education in rural Punjab Pakistan’, Gender and Education.

Khalid, A., & Rose, P. (forthcoming). Mothers’ Capability to Influence their Daughters’ Education in Pakistan: Interconnections between mothers’ value of education, negative capability and agency. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Khalid, A. (in preparation) ‘Comparisons of hope, education, and aspirations between Pakistani mothers and revolutionaries: The being and becoming of agents in the contexts of change’. Comparative Education

Khalid, A. & Singal, N. (in preparation) ”It’s made us stronger as a family’: Ethnic minority parenting experiences of educating children in England during Covid’. Journal of Family Studies

Singal, N. & Khalid, A. (in preparation) ”Time moves fast but it also goes slow’: Secondary school children’s experiences of ‘preparing’ for exams during lockdown in England. Children and Society

Khalid, A., Parpart, J. & Holmes, G. (Eds.) (in preparation) ‘ From the silence/voice binary to liminal spaces: Understanding gender, agency and power in a changing world’. Routledge

Khalid, A. & Siddiqi, S. (in preparation). Human Development Report 2022: Gendered inequalities in education and capability spaces for women/girls (and others) in Pakistan during Covid’. South Asia: Human Development Report UNDP

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Karen’s current roles include:

• Departmental Lecturer: teaching, supervision and research with Doctoral, MSc, and PGCE students.
• Deputy Director of Doctoral Research – convene Research Training Seminars
• PGCE Mathematics Lead
• Doctoral Teacher Fellow Coordinator
• STEM Discussion Group co-lead
• SCR Member of St Antony’s College
• Visiting Fellow at King’s College London

 

Gillian is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, teaching on the MSc Education (CDE pathway).

Gillian completed her PhD at UCL, combining an interest in both memory and language to investigate the relationship between procedural and declarative memory processes and language in children.

Her current research focusses on language assessment and intervention in children, including large-scale randomised control trials of school-based language interventions. She is part of the development team for LanguageScreen (www.languagescreen.com), an App used in schools to assess the language skills of children aged 3-8 years, and is a Director of a University of Oxford spin out company, OxEd and Assessment Ltd, created to translate research into children’s language and reading difficulties into practical applications.

Recent projects include evaluations of the Nuffield Early Language intervention (NELI) and the development of an online teacher training and support model for the programme to enable delivery at scale. Watch a video of a NELI intervention session in action on a recent trial here. She led the subsequent rollout of NELI to over 6,500 schools in 2020-21, funded by the DfE as part of its Covid 19-recovery effort. A second year of the rollout is underway.

She is currently working on the development and evaluation via randomised controlled trial of an early language enrichment programme for children in nursery

 

Publications

West, G, Shanks, DR, Hulme, C (2020) “Sustained Attention, Not Procedural Learning, is a Predictor of Reading, Language and Arithmetic Skills in Children”, Scientific Studies of Reading. 1-17.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/10888438.2020.1750618

 

West, G, Clayton, FJ, Hulme, C (2019) “Procedural and declarative learning in dyslexia”, Dyslexia. 25(3) 246-255.
DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/dys.1615

 

West, G., Vadillo, M. A., Shanks, R., & Hulme, C. (2018).” The procedural learning deficit hypothesis of
language learning disorders: we see some problems.” Developmental science, 21(2)