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JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2018). Designing Practice in I. Grosvenor and L. Rosén Rasmussen (Ed) In Making Education- Governance by Design: Routledge.

Daniels H. and Tse, H.M (2017). School Design: A Tool for Learning in “Dall’Aula all’ Ambiente di Apprendimento” From the Classroom to the Learning Environment : National Institute for Documentation, Innovation and Educational Research, Ministry of Education, Italy.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Tanzi Neto A., Stables, A., Ortega, L., and Cox, S. (2015). Learning from Pupils and Teachers – Design and Practice: How new school buildings influence teachers’ and pupils’ experience of schooling in P. Clegg (Ed) Learning from Schools London: Artifice

Journal articles

Daniels, H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Design as a Social Practice: The Experience of New Build Schools, Cambridge Journal of Education.

Daniels H., Tse, H.M., Stables, A. and Cox, S. Cox (2017) Design as a social practice: the design of new build schools, Oxford Review of Education, 43:6, 767-787

Daniels, H., Tse H.M., Ortega, L., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (at review) Changing Schools: A study of primary secondary transfer using Vygotsky and Bernstein, British Journal of Sociology of Education

Daniels, DH, Tse, HM, Stables, A, Cox, S (2017) “Design as a Social Practice: the Experience of New Build Schools”, Cadernos de Educação. (56)
DOI: http://doi.org/10.15210/caduc.v0i56.11780

Tse, H.M., S. Learoyd-Smith, A. Stables , H. Daniels (2015).  Continuity and Conflict in School Design: A Case Study from Building Schools for the Future. Special issue: ‘Designing Intelligent School Buildings: What do We Know’. Intelligent Buildings International 7(2-3): 64-82.

Reports

Tse, H.M., Daniels, H., Porter, J., Thompson, I. and Cox, S. (2018) Designing for practice: Pedagogic implications of creating new schools : School building guidance for head teachers, school building commissioners, teachers and the wider school community, Oxford University Department of Education.

Other

https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos/designing-better-schools

The massive impacts teachers have on students, learning and in a broad sense, the future of our society have driven Jessica to research pedagogy, theories of learning and teacher professional development.

Her research interests and foci can be described as:

  • Vygotskian and post-Vygotskian concepts in human development
  • Pedagogy; educational assessment
  • Teacher education and professional development
  • Methodological issues in Cultural-historical theory
  • Learning in groups; classroom interaction
  • Conditions of effective teaching
  • Slightly crossing the boundary, Jessica is also keen on bringing the fruits of educational research to medicine, especially in medical education and inter-professional work in health services.

Issac is a transdisciplinary social scientist with advanced training in education, organizational behavior, and sociology.

He is conversant with conceptual and methodological tools from diverse epistemologies and deploys them to solve theoretical and practical puzzles. His main research interests are at the intersection of organizational behavior, health care management, and complexity science.

He is curious how organizations can mobilize expertise in diverse teams to improve the quality of team decision making. His dissertation is concerned with understanding the complexities of the phenomenon of providing care for individuals with chronic conditions in interprofessional teams, as well as receiving care as an individual with chronic conditions. He uses concepts in complexity science, sociology, education, and organizational behavior to uncover the mechanisms of how organizations can harness the diverse expertise in teams. Using ethnography and social network analysis as his main tools, he examines the evolution of team structures as they tackle complex problems.

Previously, he completed graduate work at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where he received the Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship. He is currently reading a Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is a member of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory research group. In Singapore’s National Healthcare Group, he established the research unit, Health Outcomes and Medical Education Research (HOMER) in 2011, and has led since. Through the HOMER Grant, his unit has given out 83 research grants since 2011 to fund research projects that focused on developing practical knowledge and theory in the training and development of healthcare professionals. At NHG, he received the Critical Talent Special Recognition Award, and was selected for the Inspiring SEAL Leadership Training Program to be equipped for leading strategic initiatives to confront current and future challenges in Singapore’s healthcare system. He was a member of NHG’s Interprofessional Leadership Program’s Working Committee (2014-2018) and is currently a member of the Singapore Health and Biomedical Congress Scientific Committee (2015 to current).

JOIN HERE ON THE DAY

 

Recent months have seen growing concern about the rising numbers of students being excluded from secondary schools and the use of exclusion as a reaction to poor behaviour often guided by the assumption that punishment will change behaviour.

In this presentation Ian and Harry will discuss the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic may transform practices of exclusion from school. We already know that such practices are mediated by the values, assumptions and priorities that reside in local and national cultures. Ian and Harry’s work is examining the variation in exclusion that exists within and between the jurisdictions of the UK. The variation within jurisdictions reflects the ways in which policies are re-contextualised in different school and local authority settings. In this presentation they will draw on sociologies of policy and pedagogy to speculate on the ways in which inequalities may well become exacerbated in the current crisis – the ‘lesson’ being that we should not be thinking about how we return to normal but rather we should try and transform understandings of normal practice in order that the possibilities for social justice are enhanced.

About the speakers

Harry Daniels is Professor of Education within the Department. His current research interests are in school design and exclusion from school. He is interested in sociocultural and activity theory and Bernsteinian theory.  Learn more about Harry here

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education in the Department and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty.  Learn more about Ian here

Both Harry and Ian are currently working on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

Audience

This seminar will be of interest to academics, policymakers, and practitioners.

Hau Ming Tse is an Honorary Norham Fellow and an external adviser for the Group of National Experts on Effective Learning Environments, OECD and Department of Education, UK.

A qualified architect, Hau Ming was educated at Bath, Cambridge, and the Architectural Association, London. After graduating, she worked for nine years at David Chipperfield Architects, where she was an Associate Director. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield; the headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow; and the San Michele Cemetery, Venice.

Contemporary architecture’s radical approach and multidisciplinary agenda continue to influence Hau Ming’s work. Her research aims to gather empirical evidence on the impact of design on student’s engagement, well being & attainment. Her work also explores the relationship between space, perception and the environment, focusing on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Current field research include Design matters? The effects of new schools on students’, teachers’ and parents’ actions and perceptions. funded by the AHRC (2012-2016). This project examines the complex relationship between design and pedagogic practice in some of the most challenging primary and secondary schools in the UK.

Books

Tse, H.M., Daniels H., Stables, A. and Cox, S. (2018). Future of Schooling: Contemporary Visions for Education: Routledge.

Daniels H., Stables, A., Tse, H.M and Cox, S. (2018). School Design Matters: The Effects of New Schools on Students’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Actions and Perceptions: Routledge.

Stables, A., S. Learoyd-Smith, H. Daniels,  H.M. Tse (2014). Schools and Schooling as Semiotic Engagement: A Focus on Design. In I. Semetsky and A. Stables (eds.), Pedagogy and Edusemiotics: Theoretical Challenges/Practical Opportunities. Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers.

Book chapters