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Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Emmanuel Edudzie is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Oxford and a member of the Comparative and International Education Research Group in the Department of Education. He is affiliated with the Centre for Skills, Knowledge, and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), also in the Department of Education.

Emmanuel’s doctoral research is at the confluence of education policy, skills, and school-to-work transition in Africa, with a specific focus on the effect of secondary education on the employability skills of school-leavers in Ghana. When completed, the research will contribute to strengthening learning ecosystems across Africa so that they are more focused on and effective in fostering foundational skills and socioemotional learning.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Kabira is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. His research is funded by the Clarendon Fund.

Kabira is interested in improving learning outcomes for children in fragile and conflict – affected regions of the world, school health and nutrition programs, combatting gender-based violence and supporting children who are dealing with addiction.

His doctoral research focuses on education outcomes for young learners in Papua New Guinea who are addicted to psychoactive and carcinogenic betel quid.

Prior to moving to Oxford, Kabira was based in Washington DC, USA and worked for the World Bank and Save the Children on impact evaluations, learning assessments and improving the quality of education statistics in twenty-six countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Pacific, and the Middle East.

Kabira holds a Masters in Economics and Public Policy from Princeton University where he was a recipient of the Stokes’ Prize for exemplary academic achievement and public service leadership, a Masters in Development Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University where he graduated with distinction and an undergraduate degree in Economics and Statistics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Research interests:

·       Education in conflict regions

·       Combatting school related gender-based violence (SRGBV)

·       School health and nutrition programs

·       Supporting children with addiction

 

Publications

Having a background in political science, international relations and history, Alina obtained an MA in Developmental Psychology. Alina is a DPhil student and intends to research prosocial behaviour.

Supervisors

Liam Gearon and Maia Chankseliani

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Gia-Yen is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on support for early career teachers and the development of policy frameworks for the system-wide implementation of mentoring and induction as a mechanism for teacher retention and teaching quality.

Gia-Yen holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education), a Masters in Teaching (Secondary)(Research), a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Science (Distinction) with a major in Neuroscience. Gia-Yen is a secondary Mathematics and Science teacher and has previously worked across education policy and not-for-profit sectors with an overarching aim of addressing educational inequity in Australia.

Khansa is a disability rights activist, researcher, and independent consultant with a professional background in Culture, Politics, International Development, and Inclusive Education. Over the past few years, Khansa has collaborated with both international and local organizations to develop strategies for fostering inclusion and addressing various Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) issues.

Supervisors

Aliya Khalid and Ann Childs

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and Engl