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Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Through interviews with headteachers and teachers, Shailen is seeking to tell the story of how the policy of assessing without level descriptors has been interpreted and enacted in six primary schools in Oxfordshire.

Shailen has worked for many years in children and young people services for local authorities, charities and also his own social enterprise.  He tries to create educational programmes and environments which nurture the whole person and build self-esteem.

Title of Thesis

How have primary schools interpreted and enacted Assessment without Levels

Publications

Ethnicity and Education in England: How Lammy has distracted us.  Oxford Forum Journal, January 2018  Popat, S., Lenkeit, J., Hopfenbeck, T. N. (2017)

PIRLS for Teachers – A review of practitioner engagement with international large-scale assessment results.  Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment Report OUCEA/17/1)

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Owen’s research focuses on large-scale assessments of early-stage literacy in low-and-middle-income countries and how recent advances in communication technology and artificial intelligence can be used to improve them.

Few countries currently administer rigorous, granular and reliable assessments of early-stage literacy, despite their widely acknowledged importance and the relative wealth of existing methods explicitly designed to address the challenge of accurately evaluating learners before they can independently read passages. While, in recent years, assessments such as ASER, UWEZO, and EGRA have been created which are explicitly designed to measure basic literacy skills in a context appropriate manner, on closer inspection they still fall far short of the rigor, granularity and reliability of already existing early-stage literacy assessments commonly used in classroom and research settings. This raises the question of why more robust early-stage literacy assessment techniques have not been incorporated in large-scale assessment in low and middle-income countries.

This is likely because, until recently, conducting systematic, high-quality, early age literacy assessments were infeasible for resource-constrained governments to conduct, due to the logistical challenges and cost. However, the combination of the plummeting price of smart-phones and tablets, rapidly expanding cellular data coverage and advances Natural Language Processing might potentially allow for the creation of a computerized, adaptive and highly sophisticated assessments to be deployed by non-specialists. Low-cost tablets would enable computer adaptive testing techniques and asynchronous testing.

Mobile data coverage would allow results to be immediately easily scored and uploaded to improve predictive models of student performance. Rapidly improving Natural Language Processing, specifically speech recognition, could make feasible the automatic scoring of oral fluency, which is both an extremely strong predictor of reading comprehension and extremely time intensive to administers as it must be conducted by highly trained reading specialists.

Professionally, Owen has worked as a classroom teacher in New Orleans as part of Teach for America, as a consultant to ed-tech startups in Latin America and currently as Director of Pearson Affordable Learning Fund (PALF) where he is continuing his role while be pursue s a DPhil part-time. PALF is an impact investing fund that backs innovative educational start-ups in low-and-middle income countries. In addition to monitoring the business performance of the portfolio companies by serving on their various board, he work with the teams to measure, report and improve student learning outcomes.

Jamie is a first-year DPhil candidate in Education, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

His DPhil research will explore the role that reading proficiency plays in pupils’ performance in national (Key Stage 2) and international (TIMSS) assessments of primary mathematics. In particular, his research will assess the extent to which children with low reading proficiency in English are negatively affected by the language used in these test-items, and how this can be reduced through changes to test-item language. His DPhil is supervised by Dr. Joshua McGrane and Dr. Therese N. Hopfenbeck.

Prior to his DPhil, Jamie completed his undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology, and his MSc in Education, both at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a 1:1 special-educational-needs teaching assistant in an Oxfordshire primary school, and since June 2017, he has worked as a research assistant at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA). His main role has been as a co-author of England’s National Report for the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS).

Title of Thesis

The moderating role of reading proficiency in pupils’ performance on national and international assessments of primary mathematics

Publications

Marja’s research to date has focused on female leaders in education.

Her doctoral research focuses on OECD countries with a strong educational system as according to the programme for international student assessment (PISA).

Marja works as a Deputy Head at Tallinn English College and a visiting lecturer at Tallinn University in Estonia. She holds an MA in Education Management and a BA in Psychology.

Zhanxin is a DPhil candidate in education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include the assessment policy, the predictability and standards of high-stakes tests, assessment for learning and e-assessment.

Zhanxin took her undergraduate study at Beijing Normal University. She joined several research projects which mainly focused on the equity problems in education fields and the school integration situation of underprivileged children. After the completion of her bachelor’s degree, she started her Master in Educational Assessment at Institute of Education, UCL. In her Master’s dissertation, Zhanxin explored how do primary teachers in two case Chinese schools perceive and practice Assessment for Learning (AfL). Her DPhil thesis aims to explore the predictability of China’s National College Entrance Examination (gaokao).

Title of Thesis

The Predictability of the National College Entrance Examination in China.

 

 

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second lan