Skip to content

Department of Education

Viewing archives for Student

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Margo is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. Her research interests focus on professional and vocational education as well as social mobility and social inclusivity in the context of higher education.

Margo’s DPhil research aims to examine Master of Business Administration (MBAs) programs as a means of human capital acquisition, and potential links between generation of this type of capital and social mobility for MBA students. She wants to explore to what extent generation of human capital can lead to social movements for MBA participants, and how this may be impacted by various social inclusion and meritocratic factors.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Margo received a first class Master’s degree (with honours) in Financial Management at the University of Warsaw, completed PGCE in Business Education at University College London, and a Master’s degree in Educational Assessment at the University of Oxford. She also spent 15 years working in investment banking where alongside her M&A work, she developed interests in professional education, on-the-job learning, and coaching.

Yushan Xie is a Doctoral student in education and a Clarendon scholar at the University of Oxford. Her research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College.

Her research focuses on the self-formation of students of rural backgrounds in universities in China, against the backdrop of higher education massification, urbanisation and digitalisation.

Prior to Oxford, Yushan worked as a social entrepreneur in rural Hunan Province and educational policy researcher which enabled her to conduct health and education intervention research in the rural west of China, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces. She also gained professional experience in working as a youth culture researcher in a leading Chinese consulting firm.

Yushan completed her MPhil in Education from Cambridge University where she was awarded a ‘Best Dissertation Award’ from the Faculty and the ‘Special Commendation Award’ from the British Council ELT Master’s Dissertation Competition. She holds a BA in Translation from Nankai University in China during which she was awarded the National Scholarship from the Ministry of Education.

 

Publications

Xie, Y. & Liu. Y. (2021). Who do you hand out with? How Chinese students’ social networks relate to perceived oral proficiency gains during study abroad experiences. Study Abroad Research in Second Language Acquisition and International Education, 6(1), 59-90.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns forme