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Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environments, and how exposure to these machines is related to way children construct a basic understanding of the world around them. In addition, I am also hoping that my findings will prefigure to a certain extent how the nature of human-machine relationships might look like in a couple of years and decades from now.

I am a pragmatic proponent of mixed methods designs, with a particular emphasis on advanced quantitative means of scientific inquiry. I also hold a strong interest in philosophical issues related to the ongoing rise of artificial/machine intelligence.

Journal articles
  • Festerling, J., & Siraj, I. (2020). Alexa, what are you? Exploring Primary School Children’s Ontological Perceptions of Digital Voice Assistants in Open Interactions. Human Development, 64, 26–43. https://doi.org/10.1159/000508499
Internet publications:
Other:
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Changing Nature of Childhood Environments – Investigating Children’s Interactions with Digital Voice Assistants in Light of a New Paradigm. Proceedings of The Thirteenth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions – ACHI 2020, 73–78.
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Alexa, How Do You Change Us? Annual Poster Conference of the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36687.30887
  • Festerling, J. (2020). Innovators’ Freedom to Challenge Our Paradigms: Why the Copernican Legacy Should Guide Our Progression through the Incipient Age of Artificial Intelligence. Proceedings of the Global Essay Competition at The Fiftieth St. Gallen Symposium. http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.18644.22405/1

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Before starting at Oxford, Peter taught English and Maths, both in the UK and abroad.

Additionally he has completed research for The Northern Irish Civil Service and Civitas, a UK think tank, on patterns of UK school segregation. He holds a 1st class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics BA from Queens University, Belfast and a Masters of Education from The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Title of Thesis

Understanding Ethnically Integrated Schools in the UK

Publications

Mitchell, P. (2017) 10 Things to Keep in Mind When Advocating for Your Child., Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) 5 Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Racial Bullying in School, Cambridge, MA.: RIDES, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mitchell, P. (2017) A student centred analysis of ethnic segregation in London’s schools, London, UK.: Civitas Institute for the Study of Civil Society.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

Pierre is using quasi-experimental quantitative methods to gauge the effects of participating in college and career pathway programs in Massachusetts, under the supervision of Ariel Lindorff and Steve Strand.

Originally from Les Cayes, Haiti, he most recently lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he was working as a Research Analyst at Harvard University and later as a Policy Analyst at the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Pierre earned a Bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and Master’s degrees from the Ohio State University and Brown University, respectively.

Today’s young generations are among the first ones to grow up in an environment where digital voice assistants (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant) can emulate some innate capabilities of their human Creators, such as the autonomous use of human language and speech. My dissertation aims to contribute to a theoretical as well as empirical understanding of what role voice assistants play in today’s home and childhood environme