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Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Ellen has been a school counsellor, IBDP & university psychology lecturer for international institutions in Greece for the last 15+ years.

Her passion for engaging youth ages 12-24 in community service- learning prompted her to initiate the non-profit organization, EIMAI-Center for Emerging Young Leaders. As director of EIMAI and PeaceJam Greece, Ellen provides programs for youth leadership development by bringing together university mentors and vulnerable youth with Nobel Peace Laureates to empower their transition to adulthood. Ellen has served on the executive board of Habitat for Humanity, Greater Athens and the Greek Adlerian Psychological association, where she has been trained as an Adlerian therapist. Her service- learning work with youth has been awarded by the Near East South Asia Council of Overseas schools, the Nobel Peace Laureate initiative- Billion Acts of Peace, the Loukoumi-Make a Difference Foundation and best practices in character education by Character.Org.

Ellen’s research interests include: adolescent purpose, youth trauma, student voice, transitions to adulthood, experiential learning, youth in social care and unaccompanied refugee minors.

Her dissertation topic will explore a trauma informed approach to service-learning to increase agency in learning for vulnerable youth.

Ellen has a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Arizona State University, a Master’s of Education—Special Emphasis School Counseling from University of La Verne, California and Master’s in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Yousef’s current doctoral research explores the educational resilience pathways of unaccompanied refugee minors. Their research draws upon data and fieldwork from Jordan and Greece.

Yousef is also a research officer at the department, working with the Rees Centre on local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein), and with TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research programme in India and the Philippines (PI: Professor Sonali Nag).

Prior to their doctoral studies, Yousef worked in program management and social data analytics for various NGOs, governments, and United Nations agencies internationally. Yousef holds a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University and a Master of Education from Harvard University.

 

·         Feinstein, L., Aleghfeli, Y. K., Buckley, C., Gilhooly, R., & Kohli, R. K. S. (2021). Conceptualising and measuring levels of risk by immigration status for children in the UK. Contemporary Social Science, 16(5), 538–555. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.2007279

·         Aleghfeli, Y. K., & Hunt, L. (2021). Protocol for a systematic mixed-methods review of risk and resilience factors for the education of unaccompanied refugee minors in high-income countries. International Database of Education Systematic Reviews. https://idesr.org/?doc=IDESR000002

·         UNDP. (2017). E-Consultation: Somalia 2016, towards an inclusive Somalia national development plan 2017-2019. https://www2.sdgactioncampaign.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/report-somalia-e-survey-ndp-sdgs-4.pdf

 

Jane is a part of the Rees Centre for Fostering and Education. Jane’s research interests lie in the socioemotional development of young children, especially areas related to challenging behaviour, self-regulation, and early intervention.

Prior to her beginning as a Doctoral student, Jane read for the M.Sc in Child Development and Education at the University of Oxford and a BA in Early Childhood and Families Studies at the University of Washington.

Publications
  • Sohn, B., Buchanan, A., Heo, K., & Lee, J. J. (2019). Explanatory effects of young childhood caregiving environment, child’s pro-social behavior, and child’s self-regulation skills on adolescent problem behavior. Children and Youth Services Review, 100, 298-303. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.01
  • Lee, J. J. & Sohn, B. (2020). Effects of student-teacher relationships on the problem behavior trajectories of children and adolescent. Academic Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology, 9(5), 47-49

Vânia is a Doctoral Candidate in Education at the Rees Centre, Department of Education, conducting research in the field of foster care placement success.

Her Doctoral research aims to contribute to a deeper understanding about successful placements, through analysing the associations between parenting and professional skills of foster carers and emotional, social, and behavioural outcomes of looked after children. The analysis will also compare findings between the English and the Portuguese foster care systems.

Her academic pathway started with a degree in Psychological Sciences and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology from ISPA – University Institute. Following these degrees with two postgraduate diplomas: one in “Protection of Minors” from the Faculty of Law – University of Coimbra, and the other in “Data Analysis in the Social Sciences” from ISCTE-University Institute of Lisbon. She also gained professional experience in the Portuguese child protection system by working as a Clinical Psychologist in vulnerable communities.

Currently she is a research collaborator at the InEd-Center for Research and Innovation in Education, School of Education of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, and a Board member of various networks, such as: the EUSARF Academy, the Oxford Children’s Rights Network, and the Centro de Estudos Comparados da Criança em Família. She has several publications in the field of child protection systems, decision-making processes, foster care, and indicators of placement success.

Publications
  • Delgado, P., Pinto, V. S., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Gilligan, R. (2018). Contact in Foster Care in Portugal. The views of children in foster care and other key actors. Child & Family Social Work, 1-8.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V. S., & Oliveira, J. (2017). Carers and Professionals’ Perspectives on Foster Care Outcomes: The Role of Contact. Journal of Social Service Research, 43(5), 533-546.
  • Carvalho, J. M. S., Delgado, P., Benbenishty, R., Davidson-Arad, B., & Pinto, V. S.  (2017). Professional Judgments and Decisions on Placement in Foster Care and Reunification in Portugal. European Journal of Social Work, 21(2), 296-310.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., Pinto, V.S., & Martins, T. (2016). Decision, Risk and Uncertainty Withdrawal or Reunification of Children and Young People In Danger? Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 28(2), 217-228.
  • Delgado, P., Carvalho, J. M. S., & Pinto, V. S. (2014). Growing-up in Family: The Permanence in Foster Care. Pedagogía Social. Revista Interuniversitaria, 23(1), 123-150.
  • Delgado, P., & Pinto, V. S. (2011). Criteria for the selection of foster families and monitoring of placements. Comparative study of the application of the Casey Foster Applicant Inventory-Applicant Version (CFAI-A). Children and Youth Services Review, 33(6), 1031-1038.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schoo