Department of Education

Viewing archives for English Medium Instruction

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods and Japanese language learning.

He has published numerous research articles related to applied linguistics in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the current coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network.

 

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Ernesto Macaro is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics and a Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, University of Oxford.

He is the founding Director of the Centre for Research and Development in English Medium Instruction (EMI) in the department. He was also the Director of the Department from 2013 to 2016.

Before becoming a teacher educator and researcher Ernesto was a language teacher in secondary schools in the UK for 16 years during which time he obtained an MA at the University of Warwick. He then obtained a PhD from the University of Reading whilst teaching on that institution’s PGCE course. He joined the Department of Education at Oxford in 1999 and soon after introduced the area of Applied Linguistics by designing the Masters in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

Ernesto’s current research focuses on second language learning strategies and on the interaction between teachers and learners in second language classrooms and in those where English is the medium of instruction. He has published widely in these areas.

Ernesto is currently supervising doctoral students researching the following topics:

• English Medium Instruction in Turkish Higher Education
• The interaction in science lessons where English is the Medium of Instruction
• The vocabulary learning strategies of students in English Medium Instruction classes

Ernesto continues to be highly research active and is frequently called upon to give keynotes, plenary lectures and workshops in many parts of the world as well as providing consultancies on language policy.

Current or recent research projects

The effects of teacher codeswitching on acquisition of second language vocabulary

Using listening comprehension texts as the tasks around which the intervention took place, year 9 students were taught vocabulary by either being provided with target language information or via first language information. We measured pre- post and delayed tests.
Funding Body: ESRC

EMI in Turkey: A collaborative experiment

The research investigated the extent to which it is feasible and beneficial for English language specialists in Turkish universities to collaborate with academic subject specialists teaching through the medium of English in the preparation and delivery of content lessons or lectures.
Funding body: part funded by Oxford University Press

Decoding French, Motivation and Foreign Language Learning

This study involved an England-wide survey of Key Stage 3 learners of French in comprehensive schools which elicited respondents’ mastery and perceptions of decoding French (from the written form to the spoken form) and correlated these results with the same learners’ self-reports on their self-efficacy in French, their attributions of success and failure in French and their motivation to continue learning it.
Funding Body: ESRC

The certification of EMI teachers in Higher Education

The study sought to establish the feasibility of certifying the teaching competence of teachers teaching academic subjects through the medium of English in non-anglophone contexts. Specifically it investigated teacher attitudes towards the kinds of competencies needed and whether it was possible and/or beneficial for the certification to be awarded at an institutional, national, or international level.
Funding Body: Fell Fund (University of Oxford)

Transition from secondary CLIL to tertiary EMI in Italy

The research investigates the challenges faced by students transitioning from the upper secondary school CLIL classroom to EMI in Universities. Specifically it measures the lexical knowledge needed to adequately understand lectures in the L2 (English) and the strategies that students might use to compensate for lexical deficiencies.
Funding Body: The British Council

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is Vice-Chair of the National Association for Language Development in the Curriculum (NALDIC). He is editor of NALDIC’s blog EALjournal.org, and associate editor of the EAL Journal, NALDIC’s professional periodical. He is on the advisory panel for Assessing Claims in Education project in collaboration with the Education Endowment Foundation and the Chartered College of Teaching.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews.

Publicatons

Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (in press). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Murphy, V. Arndt, H., Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., Chalmers, H., Macaro, E., Rose, H., Vanderplank, R. & Woore, R. (2020). Foreign language learning and its impact on wider academic outcomes: A rapid evidence assessment. London: EEF.

Müller, L., Morris, A., Sharples, J., Chislett, J., Rose, N., Chalmers, H. (2020). How to assess claims about cognition and learning: The ACE concepts. Impact, Issue 8, Spring 2020, 60-63.

Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. Oxford:OUP.

Chalmers, H. (2019) Why all the fuss about Randomised Trials? researchED Magazine, February 2019, 13-14.

Chalmers, H. and Crisfield, E. (2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact, Issue 5, Spring 2019, 40-43.

Chalmers, H. (2017). What does research tell us about using the first language as a pedagogical tool? EAL Journal. Summer, 54-58.

Chalmers, H. (2016). How to … inspire EAL students. Times Educational Supplement. 20 November, 42-43.

Chalmers, H. (2014). Harnessing linguistic diversity in polylingual British curriculum schools. Do L1 mediated home learning tasks improve learning outcomes for bilingual children? A randomised trial. Masters Dissertation. Published online by the British Council.

Chalmers, H. (1999). Did Microsoft commission a fair test of the geographical knowledge of British children? TERSE Report. Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring, Durham University.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Anuchaya (Anya) is a lecturer in an English Language Program at the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Mahidol University, Thailand.

She is currently reading a DPhil in Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and is working on a doctoral thesis entitled “Investigating EFL Teachers’ Cognition and Incorporation of Global Englishes into their Pedagogical Practices.”

Publications

Rose, H., & Montakantiwong, A. (2018). A Tale of Two Teachers: A Duoethnography of the Realistic and Idealistic Successes and Failures of Teaching English as An International Language. RELC Journal, 49(1), 88-101.

Ikuya is a DPhil student in the Department of Education. He is also a doctoral researcher of the English Medium Instruction (EMI) Research Group.

His DPhil research explores the effects of English Medium Instruction (EMI) on undergraduate students’ learning of Chemistry in Japan. In his research, Ikuya undertook a direct comparison between students studying introductory Chemistry in an EMI course and those studying the same curriculum in a Japanese medium instruction course. An analysis was undertaken of students’ learning outcomes measured by pre-post course content tests. These measurable test differences were triangulated with student and teacher interviews, in addition to lecture observations, in order to identify further differences in their perceived content learning experience.

Alongside his DPhil study, Ikuya also works part-time as a research assistant at the English Medium Instruction Research Group and a tutor for the Critical Reading Workshop on MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (MSc ALSLA).

Publications
Book Chapters
  • Aizawa, I. & McKinley, J. (2020). EMI challenges in Japan’s internationalisation of higher education. In Bowles, H. & Murphy, A. (Eds.), English medium instruction and the internationalisation of universities. Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783030478599
  • Aizawa, I., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2022). Success Stories from English-Medium Instruction Undergraduate Students in Japan: Student Perceptions of Challenge and Benefit. In McKinley, J. & Galloway, N. (Eds.), English Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International perspectives. Bloomsbury, contracted and in progress.
Journal Articles
  • Aizawa, I. & Rose, H. (2020). High school to university transitional challenges in English Medium Instruction in Japan. System. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2020.102390
  • Aizawa, I., Rose, H., Thompson, G., & Curle, S. (2020). Beyond the threshold: Exploring English language proficiency, linguistic challenges, and academic language skills of Japanese students in an English Medium Instruction programme. Language Teaching Research. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1362168820965510
  • Aizawa, I., & Rose, H. (2019). An analysis of Japan’s English as medium of instruction initiatives within higher education: the gap between meso-level policy and micro-level practice. Higher Education, 77, 1125–1142. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-018-0323-5.
  • Thompson, G., Aizawa, I., Curle, S., & Rose, H. (2019). Exploring the role of self-efficacy beliefs and learner success in English Medium Instruction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050.2019.1651819
  • Rose, H., Curle, S., Aizawa, I., & Thompson, G. (2019). What drives success in English medium taught courses? The interplay between language proficiency, academic skills, and motivation. Studies in Higher Education, 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1590690

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, who specialises in language teaching research. He is the course leader for the MSc/PGDip in Teaching English Language in University Settings and the MSc/PGDip in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a Masters and PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Before coming to Oxford, Heath oversaw the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin, and was Director of the Centre of English Language Learning and Teaching.

Heath’s interests are firmly situated within the field of Second Language Teaching and Learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods an