Department of Education

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Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Natia Sopromadze is a Research Officer working on the project “Education partnerships for development: Sustaining teacher quality in context”.

The study aims to investigate teacher education and early career teaching experiences across selected countries eligible for official development assistance. The research is funded by the John Fell Fund at the University of Oxford and is led by Prof Diane Mayer. Within this project, Natia is responsible for trialling a multi-country survey in collaboration with researchers and policymakers in Bhutan, Malawi, Mexico, Moldova and Timor-Leste.

Natia has international experience in different higher education contexts having worked at Georgian, Kuwaiti and UK universities. She is interested in comparative research methodology, particularly, issues of equivalence across diverse cultures and languages. Her research interests also include narrative, visual, digital and mixed methods at the intersection of disciplines.

Before joining the Department of Education in January 2020, Natia was part of collaborative research projects at the University of Wolverhampton, where she examined effective learning spaces and inclusive science education at tertiary level. Prior to this, Natia was an Early Career Fellow at the Warwick Institute of Advanced Study, where she co-organised an online symposium on “Methodological Innovations in Cultural Research.”

Natia holds a BA in English Philology from Akaki Tsereteli State University (Georgia), an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation and a PhD in Education from the University of Warwick (UK).

Journal Articles

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2017) Do we see through their eyes? Testing a bilingual questionnaire in education research using cognitive interviews. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 524-540. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1743727X.2016.1181163

Sopromadze, N. (2011) Bologna reforms in Georgia: Changes, challenges and pitfalls. International Journal ‘Intellect’, Georgian Foundation for Development of Sciences and Society, Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 166-169.

Reports

Goodall, J., Smith, R., & Sopromadze, N. (2013) An investigation into the training and development needs of Heads of Department in English Universities. British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society, pp. 1-12.

Research Blog Posts

Sopromadze, N. (2019) What I meant and the respondent assumed: Improving survey questions with cognitive interviews. BERA Blog, British Educational Research Association.

Conference Papers

Sopromadze, N. (2019) ‘Lead with heart, manage with care: Emotional experience of departmental leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Responsibility of Higher Education Systems: What? Why? How?, The European Higher Education Society (EAIR) 41th Annual Forum, Leiden University, August 25-28, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Sopromadze, N., Karodia, N., Butler, R., Rhodes, J., Prior, R., Stanley, J. (2019) ‘Changing spaces: academic staff’s perceptions of conventional and imagined learning environments’ at 11th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (EduLearn), Palma Convention Centre, July 1-3, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Sopromadze, N. (2018) “Vignettes in comparative education research: Interviewer as a storyteller” at Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis, Comparative Education Society in Europe (CESE) Conference, University of Cyprus, May 29 – June 1, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Sopromadze, N. (2016) “From English to Georgian: Questionnaire translation and adaptation in comparative education research” at International Conference Education, Reflection, Development, Babeș-Bolyai University, July 8-9, Cluj, Romania.

Sopromadze, N. (2015) “Am I We? Perceptions of self and others in leadership discourse” at Warwick International Postgraduate Conference in Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, June 23-25, Coventry, UK.

Sopromadze, N., Moorosi, P. (2014) “Do we see through their eyes? Testing a web-based survey through cognitive interviews” at British Educational Research Association Conference (BERA), London Institute of Education, September 23-25, London, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2014) “Emotional leadership in higher education: A cross-cultural study of heads of department in Georgia and England” at Opening up the Ivory Tower, Kaleidoscope Conference, University of Cambridge, May 29-30, Cambridge, UK.

Sopromadze, N. (2013) ‘A cross-cultural comparative study of emotional leadership at Georgian and English universities’ at Challenges and Innovation, Students’ Ongoing Research in Education Studies Graduate Conference (STORIES), Department of Education, University of Oxford, March 12-13, Oxford, UK.

Darshini Nadarajan is a doctoral student whose research is centrally concerned with unpacking the notion of what it means to be a ‘proficient’ English language teacher in Malaysia and consequently, the discourses, practices, and identities that manifest from aspiring to be ‘proficient’.

Drawing upon epistemologies of the South and situating her study within the dynamism of education as a performative practice, her research is informed by sociological, linguistics, and anthropological lenses that aim to decolonise and indigenise knowledge along with developing theorisations that are aligned with such worldviews. Animating her research is a persistent curiosity in exploring the power and politics of education. In particular, her research dwells on scholarship that interrogates and problematises the production of knowledge and power within the intersection of gender, race and class

Darshini’s research interests are influenced by her rich and diverse educational experiences from the East and the West. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a teacher educator for the Ministry of Education Malaysia where she trained in-service English language teachers, designed and developed face-to-face and blended language courses, edited policy blueprints, as well as wrote speeches for Ministers. Darshini graduated from Macquarie University, Australia with a B.Ed TESOL and was subsequently awarded a Fulbright scholarship where she majored in Creative Writing and American Literature at Michigan State University. She then read her Masters in both TESOL from the University of Nottingham; and Educational Leadership and Management from the National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan.

Selected Conference Presentations

Darshini, N. (2019). Translingual Tensions in In-Service Teacher Education in Malaysia. Paper presented at the English Teaching & Learning International Conference, Taiwan, 27-28 July.

Darshini, N. (2018). Portraits of Cinderellas: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Exploration of Identity and English Language Learning of Foreign Domestic Workers in Malaysia. Paper presented at the International Conference on TEFL and Applied Linguistics, Taiwan, 16-17 March.

Darshini, N. (2017). Hide! There’s a Zombie in School: Students’ Perceptions of Institutional Rules in an Urban Malaysian School. Paper presented at the Sociology of Education Conference, Taiwan, 5-6 May.

Darshini, N. (2016). What Do Parents Seek? Factors Influencing Malaysian Parents’ Decision to Enroll their Children in International Schools in Malaysia. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Comparative Education Conference, Hong Kong, 15-16 April.

Darshini, N. (2015). Fiction or Friction? Bringing the ‘Creative’ Back into Creative Writing. Paper presented at the RELC International Conference, Singapore, 13-15 March.

Darshini, N. (2015). From Michigan to Mekong: Lessons Learnt from a Technologically-Impaired Teacher. Paper presented at the CamTESOL International Conference, Cambodia, 28 February-1 March.

Darshini, N. (2014). Flipping Technology! How to Flip your Language Classroom with Minimal Hair Loss. Paper presented at the Fulbright Scholars’ Mid-Year Conference, United States of America, 11-15 December

Runke received her bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University (BNU) and master’s from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) with distinction. Both of the fields were Early Childhood Education.

After graduation from HKU, she became a kindergarten teacher in China. As a teacher, she was fully conscious that the quality of teachers’ pedagogical practice is really important for children’s learning and well-being. Therefore, her current research is to explore the quality of kindergarten teachers’ pedagogical practice and its association with teachers’ leadership.

Publications
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). On the road to participatory pedagogy: A mixed-methods study of pedagogical interaction in Chinese kindergartens. Teaching and Teacher Education, 85, 81-91.
  • Huang, R., Yang, W., & Li, H. (2019). From transmissive to participatory pedagogies: A mixed- methods investigation of pedagogical interaction in Shenzhen kindergartens. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Symposium.
  • Yang, W., Su, Y., Huang, R., Zhu, J., Hsieh, W-Y., & Li, H. (2019). Coaching, teacher instruction, and early childhood development: Synthesizing the conceptual rationales and empirical effects. 2019 Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Poster.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail