Department of Education

Viewing archives for Doctoral Student

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps in the UK, Nepal, Canada, Germany, and Cyprus. He has also worked in New Zealand and the USA. He is an alumnus of Durham University (BSc), Imperial College London (MBBS), Manchester University Law School (LLM) and St Catherine’s College, Oxford (MSc).

His research interests are in migration of health workers and widening participation in health and social care careers as a means of supporting upward social mobility.

Publications

Bailey, R., Howick, J. (2019) Did John Stuart Mill influence the design of controlled clinical trials?  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 12(6):258-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/0141076819851759

Bailey, R. (August 2019) Systematic Review Protocol. In women with mild to moderate hypertension, does treatment with an oral beta-blocker improve mortality or cardiovascular morbidity outcomes compared to placebo or other antihypertensive treatment? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Prospero. National Institute for Health Research CRD42019140683.

Elena Tsvetkova is a doctoral student in the Department of Education conducting research in the field of Higher Education. Elena is a recipient of the Hill Foundation Scholarship, and she works under the supervision of Professor Alis Oancea and Professor Simon Marginson.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she obtained a Specialist degree in Linguistics and Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and Cultures (Hons) from Moscow State Linguistic University and an MA in Educational Leadership (Distinction) from the University of Manchester.

Currently, Elena’s research interests lie in the realm of educational policy and practice, in particular excellence initiatives and university rankings, academic work and teaching & learning in higher education.

Publications

Tsvetkova, E., & Lomer, S. (2019). Academic excellence as “competitiveness enhancement” in Russian higher education. International Journal of Comparative Education and Development.

Lavinia’s doctoral research explores discourses on diversity in higher education and the university’s relation to social justice, particularly in the forms of institutional diversity work and student activism, e.g. student-led decolonisation movements in the UK. Taking on an ethnographic approach, she aims to map the objectives, strategies, paradigms and challenges that lie at the core of the activities pursued by the different groups of actors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Lavinia studied Comparative Literature and Media Studies (BA) in Bonn and St Andrews and Intercultural Communication and Education (MA) in Cologne and at SOAS, London. During her master programme, she conducted a research project on the relation between diversity and knowledge production at SOAS and took part in the UNESCO World Heritage Research Class 2019/20, doing fieldwork on the formation of cultural identities in the UNESCO world heritage Laponia in northern Sweden. She also was a research assistant at the German Institute for Adult Education, Leibniz Centre for Lifelong Learning, and took part in the BMBF-funded meta-research project Digitisation in the education sector there. Moreover, she worked at the Cologne Center for Ethics, Rights, Economics, and Social Sciences of Health (ceres) at the University of Cologne.

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Oscar is an experienced school leader and teacher educator at Fundación Educación Católica (Spain) and was granted a Judge Scholarship by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford to read for a part-time Dphil.

Before joining the DPhil programme, Oscar graduated with a distinction at the University of Oxford (MSc in Teaching and Learning) and completed the Certificate in Advanced Education Leadership at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is one of the leaders of the K2 Erasmus+ Programme TALENTinTBL, which replicates at international level (Ireland, UK, the Netherlands, and Spain) a professional development programme already piloted across his organisation.

Oscar is interested in the design and evaluation of teacher education programmes aimed at improving school effectiveness and driving educational change towards active and competence-led learning at secondary level and, particularly, in the Sixth Form. His research draws on the findings of his Master dissertation, focusing on the evaluation of the effectiveness and the transformative potential of teacher coaching in the Spanish Baccalaureate from a longitudinal and mixed-method approach.

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Josie is a DPhil student funded by the ESRC Grand Union DTP. Josie’s project is in collaboration with Villiers Park Educational Trust – a national charity specialising in improving educational outcomes for disadvantaged young people.

The main aim of the project is to devise and evaluate a new educational enhancement programme for young people with a history of childhood trauma, with a particular focus on those who are – or have been – in the care system.

Prior to her DPhil, Josie completed a BA (Hons) in English at Oxford Brookes University, and was awarded a bursary to complete an MA in English Literature also at Oxford Brookes University. After spending one year teaching in a specialist SEMH school, Josie gained her PGCE in Secondary (English) at the University of Oxford Department of Education. Josie then worked as an English teacher and Designated Teacher for Looked After Children at a secondary school in Oxford.

Josie’s broader research interests lie within supporting vulnerable learners, the impact of attachment and trauma awareness, and social justice in education.

 

Minto Felix is a doctoral student investigating research culture in Indian higher education and a recipient of the department’s Judge Scholarship. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research impact and quality of Indian universities, and the contribution of locally and regionally led research to India’s economic and social development.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a consultant with the Nous Group, providing strategy and public policy advice to UK higher education institutions and other sectors. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia where he was a recipient of the Vice-Chancellor’s “Ancora Imparo” student leadership award and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Diversity and Inclusion.

 

Roger is a part-time General Practitioner in the National Health Service. He also works for NHS England and for the Ministry of Justice.

He grew up in the UK, Malta, Nigeria, and Kuwait. Before joining the Health Service, he served as a doctor in the Roy