Department of Education

Viewing archives for Doctoral Student

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a DPhil student in Education focusing on self-regulated learning in digital learning environments.

Before starting the DPhil program, Olav worked in the educational technology industry. He is also the author of two books on how to learn effectively, and the co-instructor of the edX Massive Open Online Course Learn Like a Pro.

Olav holds an MBA with Distinction from Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, and a BSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Norwegian School of Economics.

His research interests include self-regulated learning, learning strategies, metacognition, educational technology, and assessment.

Publications

Oakley, D., & Schewe, O. (2021). Learn Like a Pro. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Brandmo, C., Bråten, I., & Schewe, O. (2019). Social and personal predictors of test anxiety among Norwegian
secondary and postsecondary students. Social Psychology of Education22(1), 43–61.

Schewe, O. (2018). Super Student. Jaico Publishing House.

Brandmo, C., & Schewe, O. (2017) Predictors of self-regulated learning in upper secondary and higher education.
The 17th Biennial Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Qingling is a DPhil student in Higher Education and a Kwok Scholar.

Qingling’s research examines the enabling and hindrance factors in enhancing the quality of higher technical education in Africa for youth upskilling and empowerment. Her research interests encompass higher technical skills training, work-based learning, university-industry collaboration, employability, and entrepreneurship.

As a part-time learner, Qingling is a full-time practitioner in international development advancing inclusive and equitable quality higher education, with focuses on quality assurance, internationalization of higher education, skills development and youth empowerment.

Holding a Master in Public Policy Degree from Oxford (Kwok Scholar) and an MSc in Development Management (Lee Scholar) from the London School of Economics and Political Science, Qingling has worked across developing contexts in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

Brian, a Rhodes scholar from Kenya, doctoral research explores teachers’ identities and professionalism under the influence of performance-based accountability systems. He holds an MSc in Education (Comparative and International Education) from the University of Oxford (UK), Honours in Education from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) and Bachelor of Education from Chuka University (Kenya). His research interests are in the areas of teacher education and professional learning, teacher beliefs and practices, teacher identity and professionalism.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Before joining the DPhil program, Johannes obtained a B.Ed. in English and German Language Studies from Tübingen University, Germany, and an M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford (Distinction). During his undergraduate studies, he spent a year at the University of Cambridge where he read Linguistics and Modern and Medieval Languages. Johannes has worked as a research assistant for several linguists in Tübingen, where he also taught introductory courses in theoretical linguistics.

Johannes’ research focuses on the role of multi-word units in primary school foreign language learning contexts both from a psycholinguistic and a pedagogical angle. His work is funded by the Department of Education.

Kason is a Titular Clarendon Scholar and a Hong Kong Jockey Club Oxford Graduate Scholar. He is a researcher working in the field of nature of science, multimodal representations, visualization and reading and writing in science.

He is a qualified biology and chemistry teacher in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. He has taught chemistry and biology in two state schools in County Durham. He was awarded a distinction in both his PGCE/QTS at Durham University and MPhil in Educational Research at the University of Cambridge. His MPhil was fully funded by Doris-Zimmern HKU-Cambridge Hughes Hall Scholarship and received Raffan Prize In Education from Hughes Hall, the University of Cambridge.

His research has been published in Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education and International Journal of Science Education. He is also a peer reviewer for Journal of Biological Education, Science and Education, Research in Science and Technological Education, as well as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

After completing BSc Psychology with Education degree at the University College London and MSc Research Design and Methodology degree at the University of Oxford, Nancy started her Dphil study focusing on the inclusion and educational supports of children with special educational needs and disabilities in China.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Olav Schewe is a